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Justin Timberlake says he's made peace with Janet Jackson

Justin Timberlake says he has made up with Janet Jackson following the infamous "wardrobe malfunction" at the Super Bowl in 2004.

When asked on a Beats 1 radio interview broadcast Thursday if he and Jackson have since made peace, Timberlake said, "Absolutely."

The singer, who is preparing for the release of his fourth solo album, says he and Jackson have talked privately about the incident.

"I don't know that a lot of people know that," Timberlake says. "I mean, I don't think it's my job to do that, because you value the relationships that you do have with people."

At the infamous halftime show, Timberlake ripped Jackson's costume to reveal her right breast, bare except for a nipple ring. Jackson was barred a week later from the Grammy telecast.

Stars turn out for swansong of Louis Vuitton designer

The celebrity allure of Paris Fashion Week was at its height on Thursday as the notables from the worlds of sports, film and fashion attended the Louis Vuitton swansong show for designer Kim Jones.

Here are some highlights of the fall-winter 2018-19 menswear shows.

STARS ATTEND VUITTON DESIGNER SWANSONG

The stars were out in force to bid farewell to Jones after Michael Burke, Vuitton's chairman and chief executive officer, confirmed he would be departing the fashion house's menswear division after six years at the helm.

When Victoria Beckham arrived solo at the Palais Royal show venue, dressed in a beige menswear coat and oversize bellbottoms, that alone was enough to trigger mayhem. But that was little in comparison to the frantic scene that ensued the moment she was joined by her husband, David, in a midnight blue Vuitton sweater, and their 18-year-old son Brooklyn in a jazzy red Vuitton-branded shirt.

Soccer player Neymar then pulled up and sent paparazzi leaping to get close to the stars.

During the show, there were screams of delight as Kate Moss and Naomi Campbell both strutted down the catwalk in sexy monogrammed rain coats for their final ode to the influential designer.

It's not known where Jones will be headed — and Versace has not confirmed reports they held discussions to bring him on.

David Beckham, a personal friend of the 38-year-old British designer, came to see him off.

"I can't wait to see what he's going to do next," Beckham said. "But it's been an amazing journey for him."

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VUITTON'S CONSTANT VOYAGE

Exploration and travel were the touchstones in Jones' sportswear-influenced collection, inspired by photos of the Kenyan landscape.

The aerial images, taken from a helicopter, were used as swirling prints and kinetic motifs on dark navy bombers, or on flat-fronted organza hunting shirts and sporty leggings.

The colors of African rock features — slate, granite and sandstone — influenced the collection's masculine palette, which was shot through with the bright colors of rock-climbing attire in neon yellow, orange and silver.

Adventure was at the heart of this fun show with big hiker boots stomping down the runway.

References spanned from the Wild West (a gray cowboy hat) to Siberia (an intarsia mink coat.)

Jones said it was about "discovering something new. A constant voyage."

He could have been referring to the collection — or perhaps his personal journey, wherever that may be.

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ISSEY MIYAKE GOES URBAN

Issey Miyake has been known to travel to the Arctic and the far-flung natural world for fashion inspiration. But on Thursday the Franco-Japanese house didn't stray far from home — channeling the urban environment.

It may have been a smart thematic way to stay on-trend with the utilitarian work wear mania stomping men's runways of late.

A utilitarian mac with zippers and toggles, notable for its voluminous proportions and twinned with white sneakers, was colored in a Renaissance-worthy carmine pink. The house designer Yusuke Takahashi always mixes in a gentle touch.

The show demonstrated why Issey Miyake is known as a techno-fabric-loving brand — several designs had an intentional "scrunched" effect owing to stretch tape stitched along the body.

A messy-looking oversized suit in gunmetal, described as "wearable without ironing," looked useful for those who need to get to work without having enough time to prepare. The model himself had slightly wild hair.

Stripes and bright colors punctuated what was a rather tame display this season.

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RICK OWENS' GREEK MYTHS

Designer Rick Owens used his funky, grungy menswear runway show to explore Greek myths.

Primitive-style fabrics in rough camel hair flannel and double-knit cotton were fashioned in slashed and almost-Biblical frayed silhouettes. The collection was inspired by the arrogant King Sisyphus, who was condemned by Zeus to roll a boulder up a hill and down forever.

The story was, said Owens, a lesson that it's easy to fall into "unhealthy cycles" in real life.

"Does this mean unhealthy cycles and base urges are an integral part of the human condition?" asked the designer-cum-philosopher. His 40 designs, which relied on layering, seemed to answer Owens' rhetorical question in the affirmative.

Huge lapels on an unstructured rock-colored coat unfurled as if they were being yanked open, above bare legs. While some white tunic looks evoked an inverted blown-up sleeve, slashed sections seemed to hint that the garment had been damaged by the impact of a boulder or by a long perilous journey.

Chains that descended down some bare chests over nipples evoked bondage but other designs included covered-up looks — huge paneled statement coats — as Owens wrestled with opposing instincts.

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Thomas Adamson can be followed at Twitter.com/ThomasAdamson_K

Long before SAG Awards, statuettes start out as molten metal

Winners of the Screen Actors Guild Awards often remark on their statuettes — their green-black appearance, their hefty weight — but the awards start out in a decidedly different state: as molten metal.

Winners often tell stories about how much the award, conferred to them by the 121,000-plus members of the guild SAG-AFTRA, mean to them. And for individual film acting winners, the honor often means another piece of hardware: an Academy Award.

Long before the glitzy awards ceremony, which will be held Sunday at Los Angeles' Shrine Auditorium, the statuettes are forged in a decidedly unglamorous foundry on an industrial side street in Burbank. Men in welding masks and reflective suits craft the trophies using a metal-working that is process centuries old to create the award, which depicts an actor holding the drama and comedy masks. Once the statuette is done, a process that takes several weeks, the award weighs 12 pounds — nearly four pounds heavier than an Oscar.

The statuettes are created by pouring molten bronze into a wax mold. The bronze is heated to approximately 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit, said Angel Meza a production manager at the American Fine Arts Foundary who has helped oversee the crafting of the award, called "The Actor," for several years. Machines whir and chains clank as the heavily-protected workers pour the liquid metal into molds, which grow bright as they're filled. After cooling down for several minutes, the men dismantle the molds and despite their oversized protective mitts, bobble the pieces in their hands as they pass them onto a table.

"To see the labor and see what really goes on, the artistry of it, I think is magnificent. These skills — I don't think people are aware," said Ann Dowd, who is nominated for a SAG Award as part of the cast for "The Handmaid's Tale." She was one of several celebrities who watched the creation of several statuettes during an event earlier this month.

"We see these beautiful old buildings, we see statues, and they're going away because that craftsmanship — it's rare, I think, to have those skills and that artistry," she said.

The initial molding process takes about 15 minutes.

It takes weeks to cast, polish, apply a patina to the dozens of statuettes needed for the SAG Awards. The show honors the best performances in film and television from the previous year. The show awards several large cast ensembles, including stunt performers, making it impossible to know before the ceremony exactly how many will be handed each year.

"Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri" is the leading film nominee, while the HBO drama "Big Little Lies" leads all television nominees.

Whether Dowd is among the winners Sunday, she said watching the crafting of the statuettes was a treat.

"Nothing thrills me more than seeing how things come together," Dowd said. "I've gone to factories, to quarries, and this was extraordinary."

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For full coverage of awards season, including a time-lapse video of the creation of the SAG Actor statuette, visit: https://apnews.com/tag/AwardsSeason

In TV interview, Farrow describes alleged Allen assault

In her first televised interview, Dylan Farrow described in detail Woody Allen's alleged sexual assault of her, and called actors who work in his films "complicit" in perpetuating a "culture of silence."

Farrow, the adopted daughter of Allen and Mia Farrow, appeared in a taped interview Thursday on "CBS This Morning." Farrow recounted the 1992 incident, when she was 7 years old, in which she said Allen molested her in her mother's Connecticut home.

"With so much silence being broken by so many brave people against so many high-profile people, I felt it was important to add my story to theirs because it's something I've struggled with for a long time," Farrow said. "It was very momentous for me to see this conversation finally carried into a public setting."

Farrow, now 32, described being taken to a crawl space by Allen.

"He instructed me to lay down on my stomach and play with my brother's toy train that was set up," she said. "And he sat behind me in the doorway, and as I played with the toy train, I was sexually assaulted," Farrow said.

Allen was investigated but wasn't charged, and he has long denied inappropriately touching Farrow. In a statement Thursday, Allen reiterated his denial and said "the Farrow family is cynically using the opportunity afforded by the Time's Up movement to repeat this discredited allegation."

"I never molested my daughter — as all investigations concluded a quarter of a century ago," Allen said.

After a seven-month investigation, a team of child-abuse specialists at Yale-New Haven Hospital concluded Dylan was not been molested. The doctor leading the investigation, John M. Leventhal, later said in a sworn statement that he theorized Dylan either invented the story or had it planted in her mind by her mother. But Connecticut state attorney Frank Maco says there was "probable cause" to charge Allen with molesting Dylan and that police had drawn up an arrest warrant, but that he decided not to pursue the case, in part because it would traumatize Dylan.

Allen noted that Dylan's older brother Moses has said he witnessed their mother coaching Dylan. "It seems to have worked — and, sadly, I'm sure Dylan truly believes what she says," said Allen. Farrow's younger brother Ronan Farrow, who has written several exposes for The New Yorker on Harvey Weinstein, has supported Dylan's claims.

Dylan Farrow first spoke publicly about the incident in a 2013 Vanity Fair article and a 2014 open letter to The New York Times. On CBS, she called Allen's version of events — that a distraught Mia Farrow coached her story — "crazy."

"What I don't understand is how this crazy story of me being brainwashed and coached is more believable than what I'm saying about being sexually assaulted by my father," Farrow said on CBS.

Dylan now lives married with a 16-month-old daughter in Connecticut. When a clip from a 1992 "60 Minutes" interview of Allen denying the allegation was played, Farrow began crying.

"He's lying, and he's been lying for so long. And it's difficult for me to see him and hear his voice," Farrow said.

In recent days, several actors who have worked with Allen have distanced themselves from the 82-year-old filmmaker.

Timothee Chalamet on Tuesday said he will donate his salary for an upcoming Allen film to three charities fighting sexual harassment and abuse: Time's Up, the LGBT Center in New York and RAINN. The breakout star of "Call Me By Your Name" said he didn't want to profit from his work on Allen's "A Rainy Day in New York," which wrapped shooting in the fall.

Rebecca Hall ("A Rainy Day in New York," ''Vicky Cristina Barcelona"), Mira Sorvino ("Mighty Aphrodite"), Ellen Page ("To Rome With Love"), David Krumholtz ("Wonder Wheel") and Griffith Newman ("A Rainy Day in New York") have all in some way distanced themselves from Allen or vowed they wouldn't work with him again.

Despite doping scandals, Olympic fever grips Russian cinemas

Russia's going crazy for the Olympics. The 1972 Olympics.

Even as the Russian team faces up to being barred from next month's Winter Games for doping offenses, audiences are flocking to see a movie about Soviet glory on the Olympic basketball court 46 years ago.

"Three Seconds" tells the story of the Soviet Union team which won gold in 1972, becoming the first basketball team in history ever to beat the United States at the Olympics.

It's a tale of Cold War rivalry, inspiring speeches and something very familiar to Russian sports fans after recent scandals — a gold medal decided by officials.

After pulling in crowds throughout the holiday season, last week "Three Seconds" became the highest-earning Russian movie ever in domestic cinemas with 1.84 billion rubles ($32.5 million) in takings, according to a government-backed statistics service.

At a screening in central Moscow on Thursday, audience members whooped and applauded as Alexander Belov sank the winning Soviet basket to beat the U.S. 51-50, and then cheered again when the original 1972 footage was played alongside the credits.

"I was crying tears of joy," cinemagoer Nina Parshikova said. To the millions of Russians who consider their country unfairly persecuted over doping allegations, even the Cold War can seem a simpler time. Audience member Yegor Druzhinin said: "Now politics plays more of a role. Then it was sport."

Actor Kuzma Saprykin used his childhood basketball experience to play Ivan Edeshko, who threw what Russians still call the "golden pass" for the Soviets' winning basket.

"I didn't think there would actually be this kind of colossal success," he told The Associated Press. "It's surprising when people send me videos, how at practically every screening people are clapping, with some kind of patriotism and spirit awakening in people."

In Russia, the game has similar significance to the U.S. "Miracle on Ice," its defeat of the Soviet hockey team at the 1980 Olympics.

The U.S. remembers the 1972 basketball gold medal game very differently — as a robbery.

The last three seconds of the final were replayed twice after the Soviet team protested their signal for a timeout had been ignored, and the U.S. players twice celebrated victory before being told to play again. On the third and final play, Soviet player Ivan Edeshko threw a full-court pass for Belov to score a last-second layup.

The result prompted days of wrangling between officials from both nations and the international basketball federation. That's left out of the movie, as is the U.S. players' decision to reject their silver medals, which still lie unclaimed with the International Olympic Committee.

The script also suggests the Soviets were facing top U.S. pros, when in fact the U.S. fielded college players including future NBA stars like three-time All Star Doug Collins, and Tom McMillen, later a congressman. The Soviet team, while technically amateurs under the then-current Olympic rules, was effectively composed of full-time pro players several years older than most of the Americans.

The movie plays up its Cold War rivalry, portraying the U.S. team and fans as brash, overconfident rule-breakers, though ultimately courageous. The movie also takes some digs at the Soviet system's rationed healthcare and the cultural divides between what would later become independent countries. Edeshko says it's a "just and honest" view.

Some family members of deceased players have objected to the way it portrays the team. Belov, who scored the winning basket, spends much of the movie balancing romance with news he's terminally ill. However, his widow told Russian media outlet Meduza that the real Belov, who died of a rare cancer in 1978 aged 26, was single and healthy in 1972.

The upcoming soccer World Cup in Russia provides more fodder for sports movies, with a biography of Soviet goalkeeper Lev Yashin in the pipeline, as well as a fictionalized story of a modern-day coach.

For Saprykin, the actor, "Three Seconds" illuminates Russia's ongoing love and respect for Soviet sports stars. He says he and Edeshko are now "like grandfather and grandson" after bonding on set — and a nagging feeling that modern athletes don't match up.

Looking at photographs of the 1972 team, "you get goosebumps because you understand that there's three people left (who played in the 1972 final) and that's it," he said. They're leaving and there aren't any new legends. That's the worst."

Pharrell and N.E.R.D to headline NBA All-Star halftime show

The NBA announced Thursday that 11-time Grammy winner Pharrell and his hip-hop-rock band N.E.R.D will headline the halftime show at the 2018 NBA All-Star game in Los Angeles next month.

Fergie, who has eight Grammys, will sing "The Star-Spangled Banner" prior to tip-off. Canadian rockers Barenaked Ladies will perform the national anthem of their home country.

The Feb. 18 game will air live at 8 p.m. Eastern on TNT from the Staples Center. It will be seen in more than 200 countries.

Pharrell and the band, which released its fifth studio album last month, will perform a medley of chart-topping hits. Fergie released her second full-length album, "Double Dutchess," and a companion visual album in September. She is a host of the new Fox show "The Four: Battle for Stardom."

Kevin Hart will open the night.

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Corrects spelling to N.E.R.D in overlines, story.

Has #MeToo gone too far? Ansari story sparks debate

The #MeToo movement has been embraced by legions of women as a vital step toward countering widespread sexual abuse and misconduct. This week, more so than at any point in the movement's brief history, there's visceral discussion about its potential for causing harm.

The catalyst was the publication by Babe.net of an account by a woman identified only as "Grace" detailing her 2017 encounter with comedian Aziz Ansari. The article intimated that Ansari deserved inclusion in the ranks of abusive perpetrators, yet many readers — women and men — concluded the encounter amounted to an all-too-common instance of bad sex during a date gone awry.

Ansari has said he apologized immediately after the woman told him about her discomfort during an encounter he believed to be consensual.

"Too many women have joined #MeToo too quickly and unthinkingly," said Carole Lieberman, a Beverly Hills psychiatrist and author of the relationship books "Bad Boys" and "Bad Girls."

"Though they may have wanted to be in solidarity with other women, the stories of dates gone wrong or women scorned have detracted from women who have been raped or seriously sexually assaulted," she said.

A conservative analyst, Carrie Lukas of the Independent Women's Forum, said Ansari "believed that everything that occurred with his accuser was consensual and welcomed."

"His reputation is now in tatters," Lukas wrote in an email. "Is that really fair?"

Online and in person, many women are talking about experiences comparable to Grace's account — encounters with men who initially seemed wonderful, but turned pushy, if not criminally abusive, when things became sexual.

Sarah Hosseini, who writes about sex for Bustle, Romper, Scary Mommy and Ravishly, said the #MeToo movement might actually benefit from the Grace/Ansari controversy, and that the movement is big enough to encompass another layer in the discussion.

"There is some really murky and confusing sexual territory here that we haven't really talked about yet collectively as a society," she wrote, adding that the woman's account in Babe was "disgusting and cringe-worthy."

"What she experienced with Ansari is not OK. But do we have language yet for intimate encounters that teeter on the edge of absolute sexual assault/abuse?" she wondered. "I don't think we do. We've lived in a misogynistic world with misogynistic sex for so long. We thought this "bad sex" was normal. Until someone spoke up and said, this is NOT normal. This is not OK."

Michael Cunningham, a psychology professor at the University of Louisville, said the Grace/Ansari encounter reflected misunderstandings that may arise due to differences between conventional dating relationships and hook-ups.

"It appears that Grace wanted Ansari to treat her as a potential girlfriend to be courted over multiple dates, rather than a pickup from a party engaging in a mutually acceptable transaction," Cunningham wrote in an email. "When he did not rise to her expectations, she converted her understandable disappointment into a false #MeToo."

Liz Wolfe, managing editor of Young Voices, a D.C.-based organization that distributes op-eds by millennials, said the Ansari story gets at the core of what men and women are taught regarding dating, sex and romance. Men should pursue, women should play hard to get.

"So many women have wondered in a situation, 'Have I said "no" decisively enough?'" Wolfe said. "They can't quite figure out whether they want to go forward or leave. ... And from the male perspective, he can't quite figure out what the woman wants."

Wolfe has noticed a generational divide in their reactions. Older women tend to think Grace should have been more vocal and assertive, or simply left Ansari's apartment. Younger women feel that Ansari should have read Grace's body language and listened to her more closely, and he was at fault for pressuring her.

Among men, likewise, there are varying views.

Tahir Duckett of ReThink, a nonprofit seeking to deter boys and young men from committing sexual assault, says the #MeToo movement "is exactly where it needs to be" as it continues to embolden victims.

"This moment absolutely calls for a changed approach to dating and courtship," he said. "It means paying just as much attention to body language as we do to words, and stopping to check in if at any time you're anything less than 100 percent certain the other participant is as enthusiastic as you about what's going on."

However, Glenn Sacks, a commentator who writes often about men's issues, said the Ansari case buttresses his belief that #MeToo "is lumping the trivial mistakes or misdeeds of the many in with the genuinely awful actions of a handful."

Warren Farrell, an early member of the National Organization for Women who more recently has authored such books as "Why Men Are the Way they Are" and "The Boy Crisis," suggested that women should bear more of the responsibility for initiating sexual interest. And he recommended training in schools for each gender to view relationship issues from the other's perspective.

"When #MeToo focuses only on women complaining and not both sexes hearing each other, it reinforces the feeling of women as fragile snowflakes rather than empowered to speak, and empowered to listen," Farrell said. "Boys and men, like girls and women, also grew up confused about what was expected of them sexually in a culture that did not make speaking about sex easy for either sex."

Alexandra Allred, an author and self-defense instructor in Dallas, groaned when she read Grace's account of her evening with Ansari.

"It really does sound like it was a mutual thing, but she thought about it later and she didn't enjoy herself," Allred said. "But this is the story of millions of young women everywhere, where you just made a mistake. This does not belong to the #MeToo movement. She should have just kept this to herself."

As a supporter of the movement, Allred worries that this kind of story might generate a backlash and prompt skepticism when other women report abuses.

"This isn't show and tell," she said. "This is a movement to educate people and hopefully stop the violence."

British actor Peter Wyngarde dies in London hospital aged 90

Longtime British television and stage star Peter Wyngarde, best known for his role as the detective Jason King in the 1970s, has died. He was 90.

His manager Thomas Bowington said Thursday the actor died Monday in Chelsea and Westminster hospital in London after an illness that lasted several months.

"His mind was razor sharp until the end," Bowington told The Associated Press. "He entertained that whole hospital. He was funny until the end."

The stylish Wyngarde and the characters he portrayed have been cited by the creators of the "Austin Powers" films as one of the inspirations for the fictional 1960s spy with a flair for flashy outfits and a taste for carousing.

Wyngarde was best known for his sleuthing role in the popular "Department S" television series but played numerous other parts, appearing in shows and movies including "The Avengers, "The Saint," ''Flash Gordon" and others.

His manager said Wyngarde had not retired from performing and that plans for further stage work and personal appearances had been cut short by his death.

"He was a mentor on everything you can think of, from sports cars to how to make a good cup of tea and how to do a tie and shirt," Bowington said.

Wyngarde's father was a diplomat. The actor was born in France and educated in several countries before starting his career in Britain.

Country stars from Vegas festival to perform Grammy tribute

Three performers at last year's Route 91 Harvest Festival where a gunman opened fire on fans will perform a tribute at this year's Grammy Awards to honor victims killed at live music events this past year.

Eric Church, Maren Morris and Brothers Osborne, who performed at the three-day country festival prior to the mass shooting last October, will collaborate on a special performance at the 60th annual Grammy Awards, airing live on CBS from New York on Jan. 28.

The shooting in Las Vegas was the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. modern history. It came in a year when 22 people were killed in a bombing outside an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, in May.

Church headlined the first night of the festival, which was the last night of his tour. A gunman perched in a window of a hotel-casino overlooking the outdoor festival opened fire on the crowd during the final night of the festival as Jason Aldean was performing, killing 58 people and injuring hundreds more.

"In all honesty, there's not a day that goes by since that day that I have not thought of it and thought of the people and the victims," Church told The Associated Press. "That being our last show of the year, I took it in differently than I have maybe taken in other shows. I savored it. I remember everything about it."

Church, who wrote a song called "Why Not Me" immediately after the shooting, said he knew some of the victims because they were members of his tightknit fan club and said he appreciates that the Grammy producers wanted to reserve time in the show to remember those music fans who had been lost.

"Mass shootings, they happen every year, unfortunately," Church said. "But this year was a little bit unique in that you had two happen at music events and one of those was the largest mass shooting in U.S. history. It's been a tragic year."

Ken Ehrlich, executive producer of the Grammys, said the country artists will perform a classic Grammy-winning song, which hasn't been announced. "We considered a number of songs. We wanted something that is universal. We wanted something that spoke to the subject, which certainly this song does," he said. "When you listen to the lyric, this one certainly stood out."

Morris, a nominee for best country solo performance, performed the night before the shooting. She said she's heard directly from fans that the attacks have left them scared to go to shows, and said that it has affected artists as well.

"As an artist and a performer, I don't want to be afraid to walk out on a stage each night," Morris said. "I know that we've all been reckoning with that for the last several months."

Morris said it felt right to have performers from that festival lead the tribute. "It reinforces even more the strength of music and the community that we all share together, artists and fans alike."

Church said the attacks shattered the sense of safety and comfort that music can sometimes bring. He said that's been the hardest thing for him as an artist to deal with, but added that those attacks can't stop musicians or their fans.

"You don't let it kill the music and you don't let it destroy the moment," Church said.

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Online:

www.grammy.com

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Follow Kristin M. Hall at twitter.com/kmhall

John Mellencamp Buys $2.3 Million 'Live-Work Space' in Manhattan

It isn't a pink house and it certainly isn't in a small town, but John Mellencamp has added to his real estate portfolio by spending $2.3 million on a "stylishly renovated" space in Manhattan.

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UK media: Police probe 3rd Spacey sex assault allegation

Britain's media say police in London are investigating a third allegation of sexual assault against two-time Academy Award winning actor Kevin Spacey.

The Metropolitan Police force said Thursday it had received an allegation "that the man sexually assaulted a man (Victim 3) in 2005 in Westminster."

The force didn't identify Spacey as the alleged perpetrator, as authorities in Britain don't name suspects until they are charged. But it said the same man was accused of an assault in 2005 and one in 2008, both in the south London borough of Lambeth. The suspect in those cases has been widely named in British media as Spacey.

The 58-year old Spacey was artistic director of London's Old Vic Theatre, located in Lambeth, between 2004 and 2015.

Listen to Dizzy Reed's New Single 'This Don't Look Like Vegas'

Guns N' Roses keyboardist Dizzy Reed is readying the release of his upcoming solo album 'Rock 'N Roll Ain't Easy' with the arrival of the set's first single.

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45 Years Ago: Rolling Stones Stage Benefit Concert for Nicaragua Earthquake Victims

The Rolling Stones lifted their unofficial ban on doing benefit concerts on Jan. 18, 1973, when they performed to aid the earthquake victims of Nicaragua.

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Ann Wilson Reflects on Sex-Abuse Message of Heart's 'Barracuda'

Ann Wilson reflected on the continued need to deliver the message of Heart's 1977 song “Barracuda” while discussing current Hollywood sexual misconduct scandals.

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Former Ozzy, AC/DC and Dio Members Form New Band Dream Child

Former Dio guitarist Craig Goldy has unveiled a new supergroup called Dream Child.

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Iggy Pop and Josh Homme's 'American Valhalla' Coming to DVD

'American Valhalla,' a documentary that follows the making of Iggy Pop's 2016 'Post Pop Depression' album with Josh Homme, will be released on home video.

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Is it news? Ansari story triggers media ethics debate

What makes a private sexual encounter newsworthy? A little-known website raised that very question after publishing an unidentified woman's vivid account of comedian Aziz Ansari's sexual advances while the two were on a date.

The story on Babe.net threw a wrench into the #MeToo movement, with some feminist writers dismissing the incident as a bad date that should have remained private. Others welcomed the piece for spurring a debate over deeper cultural attitudes that normalize aggressive behavior toward women.

Media ethics experts say it's not easy to determine what constitutes a legitimate story of sexual misconduct in the midst of a social movement that has emboldened people to speak out on subjects once considered taboo.

"What takes this out of the realm of a really bad date and into the realm of something that is publicly significant?" asked Ed Wasserman, dean of the journalism school at the University of California, Berkeley. "It's a little borderline."

  The story, which appeared Saturday, offers a detailed 3,000-word account of a night out between Ansari and a 23-year-old Brooklyn photographer that ended at the comedian's home. The woman told the site that the actor repeatedly initiated sexual activity despite what she later called "clear non-verbal cues" indicating her discomfort and lack of interest. She also reportedly told Ansari that she didn't want to "feel forced" in the encounter.

The woman told Babe.net that she eventually decided the incident was a sexual assault and said she was angered when she saw Ansari wearing a "Time's Up" pin at the Golden Globe Awards. The pin referred to a movement against sexual misconduct in Hollywood.

The website published screenshots of what it said were text messages between the two the next day. The woman told Ansari the encounter had made her uncomfortable; he texted back with an apology. The story was initially published with no comment from Ansari because, the website said, his representatives did not get back to them by its deadline.

Many major news organizations reacted cautiously. The Associated Press and other media outlets did not report on the story until Ansari issued a public statement addressing the claim the next day. The actor, who stars on the Netflix hit "Master of None," acknowledged that he apologized to a woman last year when she told him about her discomfort during a sexual encounter in his apartment that he believed to be consensual.

Feminist writers, other actors and media commentators were left to debate the public value of an anonymous tale about a confusing encounter at a time when more women are speaking publicly about sexual assault.

Some prominent women, including Whoopi Goldberg and Ashleigh Banfield, a host on the CNN spinoff HLN, concluded that the story didn't describe sexual misconduct of any kind and lacked newsworthiness. The feminist writer Jill Filipovic, in a column for The Guardian , said the piece touched on the need for more stories about "how pervasive power imbalances benefit men and make sex worse for women." But she said Babe.net squandered that opportunity by failing to "tell this particular story with the care it called for" and muddying the line between sexual assault and misogynistic behavior.  

The story's reporter and editors at Babe.net, which is less than two years old and says it has 3 million readers, have publicly defended their news judgment. "We stand by our story," said site editor Amanda Ross. Babe.net is published by Tab Media, a company that has received funding from Rupert Murdoch.

Helen Benedict, a Columbia journalism professor, said the story's one-sided, anonymous account was difficult to judge. But that, she said, encapsulates the tension between the public's need to know and the obligation of the media to protect sources, particularly people who say they are victims of sexual assault and request anonymity.

Benedict said the story didn't sufficiently press the woman on her motivations and took a flippant approach as to whether the incident constituted sexual assault. "I don't feel that the reporters asked enough about what the goal was," she said. "What does she want?"

Ryan Thomas, an assistant professor at the Missouri School of Journalism, said the piece lacked the rigor of other stories that used multiple sources to establish a clear pattern of abuse by prominent men like Harvey Weinstein and Louis C.K.

"Most of the journalism has been very methodical in identifying a catalog of incidents to build a picture of a pattern of behavior," Thomas said. By contrast, he said, the Babe.net story "focuses on a single case against a named individual by an anonymous individual," thus raising questions about its newsworthiness and the care with which it was reported.

Few have called into question the veracity of the report, particularly because Ansari himself did not dispute it.

Wasserman, the Berkeley professor, said he finds it difficult to criticize the piece for crossing any lines of journalistic integrity. After wrestling with the question of whether the article addressed an issue of legitimate public concern, he said, he "reluctantly" sided with Babe.net.

"Is this news? It really does come out of an area of activity that is normally considered to be pretty private," he said. "But on balance, the entire question of sexual misconduct arises from interactions that we should consider private."

Ex-Ataris bassist indicted, accused of telemarketing fraud

The former bassist of the rock band The Ataris awaits arraignment after he and a woman were indicted on federal conspiracy and fraud charges.

Michael Sean Davenport was arrested last month at a Little Rock, Arkansas, airport on a warrant issued by a southern Illinois federal court accusing him of running a telemarketing business in Santa Barbara, California, for eight years. The indictment alleges the business advertised houses and apartments it didn't own at low prices.

The 49-year-old Davenport is accused of defrauding more than 100,000 people out of $27 million.

Davenport and Cynthia Rawlinson, his sales manager, are charged with wire and mail fraud and conspiracy to commit wire fraud.

Davenport's attorney, Alan Karow, said in an email Wednesday night that he will "assert a vigorous defense" and that he believes Davenport is innocent. Rawlinson has no attorney listed in court records.

Is it news? Ansari story triggers media ethics debate

What makes a private sexual encounter newsworthy? A little-known website raised that very question after publishing an unidentified woman's vivid account of comedian Aziz Ansari's sexual advances while the two were on a date.

The story on Babe.net threw a wrench into the #MeToo movement, with some feminist writers dismissing the incident as a bad date that should have remained private. Others welcomed the piece for spurring a debate over deeper cultural attitudes that normalize aggressive behavior toward women.

Media ethics experts say it's not easy to determine what constitutes a legitimate story of sexual misconduct in the midst of a social movement that has emboldened people to speak out on subjects once considered taboo.

"What takes this out of the realm of a really bad date and into the realm of something that is publicly significant?" asked Ed Wasserman, dean of the journalism school at the University of California, Berkeley. "It's a little borderline."

  The story, which appeared Saturday, offers a detailed 3,000-word account of a night out between Ansari and a 23-year-old Brooklyn photographer that ended at the comedian's home. The woman told the site that the actor repeatedly initiated sexual activity despite what she later called "clear non-verbal cues" indicating her discomfort and lack of interest. She also reportedly told Ansari that she didn't want to "feel forced" in the encounter.

The woman told Babe.net that she eventually decided the incident was a sexual assault and said she was angered when she saw Ansari wearing a "Time's Up" pin at the Golden Globe Awards. The pin referred to a movement against sexual misconduct in Hollywood.

The website published screenshots of what it said were text messages between the two the next day. The woman told Ansari the encounter had made her uncomfortable; he texted back with an apology. The story was initially published with no comment from Ansari because, the website said, his representatives did not get back to them by its deadline.

Many major news organizations reacted cautiously. The Associated Press and other media outlets did not report on the story until Ansari issued a public statement addressing the claim the next day. The actor, who stars on the Netflix hit "Master of None," acknowledged that he apologized to a woman last year when she told him about her discomfort during a sexual encounter in his apartment that he believed to be consensual.

Feminist writers, other actors and media commentators were left to debate the public value of an anonymous tale about a confusing encounter at a time when more women are speaking publicly about sexual assault.

Some prominent women, including Whoopi Goldberg and Ashleigh Banfield, a host on the CNN spinoff HLN, concluded that the story didn't describe sexual misconduct of any kind and lacked newsworthiness. The feminist writer Jill Filipovic, in a column for The Guardian , said the piece touched on the need for more stories about "how pervasive power imbalances benefit men and make sex worse for women." But she said Babe.net squandered that opportunity by failing to "tell this particular story with the care it called for" and muddying the line between sexual assault and misogynistic behavior.  

The story's reporter and editors at Babe.net, which is less than two years old and says it has 3 million readers, have publicly defended their news judgment. "We stand by our story," said site editor Amanda Ross. Babe.net is published by Tab Media, a company that has received funding from Rupert Murdoch.

Helen Benedict, a Columbia journalism professor, said the story's one-sided, anonymous account was difficult to judge. But that, she said, encapsulates the tension between the public's need to know and the obligation of the media to protect sources, particularly people who say they are victims of sexual assault and request anonymity.

Benedict said the story didn't sufficiently press the woman on her motivations and took a flippant approach as to whether the incident constituted sexual assault. "I don't feel that the reporters asked enough about what the goal was," she said. "What does she want?"

Ryan Thomas, an assistant professor at the Missouri School of Journalism, said the piece lacked the rigor of other stories that used multiple sources to establish a clear pattern of abuse by prominent men like Harvey Weinstein and Louis C.K.

"Most of the journalism has been very methodical in identifying a catalog of incidents to build a picture of a pattern of behavior," Thomas said. By contrast, he said, the Babe.net story "focuses on a single case against a named individual by an anonymous individual," thus raising questions about its newsworthiness and the care with which it was reported.

Few have called into question the veracity of the report, particularly because Ansari himself did not dispute it.

Wasserman, the Berkeley professor, said he finds it difficult to criticize the piece for crossing any lines of journalistic integrity. After wrestling with the question of whether the article addressed an issue of legitimate public concern, he said, he "reluctantly" sided with Babe.net.

"Is this news? It really does come out of an area of activity that is normally considered to be pretty private," he said. "But on balance, the entire question of sexual misconduct arises from interactions that we should consider private."

'Fire and Fury' about Trump's White House sells big 2nd week

Michael Wolff's "Fire and Fury" sold more than 190,000 hardcover copies last week, the book's first full week of publication, a company which tracks the retail market told The Associated Press on Wednesday.

In less than two weeks since its release, combined e-book, audio and hardcover sales now top 500,000 for Wolff's sensational account of a dysfunctional Trump administration.

NPD BookScan, which compiles about 85 percent of hardcover and paperback sales, told the AP that about 220,000 hardcover copies have sold in all. That number is expected to go much higher. The book caught on with so many people that publisher Henry Holt and Co. has struggled to keep copies available. Amazon.com, where "Fire and Fury" has been No. 1 throughout its publication, is advising customers that shipments may take 2-4 weeks. NPD BookScan does not register a sale until the book has actually been sent.

Meanwhile, "Fire and Fury" also has been a hit in other formats. Last week, CEO John Sargent of Holt parent company Macmillan told the AP that "Fire and Fury" had sold more 250,000 copies as an e-book and more than 100,000 in audio. More than 1 million hardcover copies are in print.

"Fire and Fury" is among the fastest selling nonfiction books in recent years, likely helped by President Donald Trump's denunciations and threats to sue. It also was last week's dominant seller. According to BookScan, no other release even reached 30,000 copies.

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